What Is The Food Grade Of Your Favorite Honey?

Food grading is a mandatory process performed in processed consumable foods such as fruits, vegetables, processed foods and drinks and others.  According to the CRP Press and PHI Learning, it involves the inspection, assessment and sorting of various food quality, freshness, legal conformity and market value. Oftentimes, it is done by hand in which foods are assessed and sorted.

Organic and processed food both undergo the process of food grading, one of which is honey and the process called as honey grading. The USDA is the authority that performs this general process of food grading. According to the United States Standards for Grades of Extracted Honey of USDA, in the US, honey grading is performed voluntarily based upon USDA standards. The USDA does offer inspection and grading "as on-line or in-plant or lot inspection...upon application, on a fee-for-service basis.” Based on the report, honey is graded based upon a number of factors, including water content, flavor and aroma, absence of defects and clarity. Honey is also classified by color, though it is not a factor in the grading scale.

The honey grade scale set by the USDA is Grade A, Grade B, Grade C, and Substandard. It is composed of four factors which are the water content, flavor and aroma, absence of defects and clarity.

For a honey to be given a Grade A standard, it should have a water content less than 18.6%, and for its flavor and aroma to pass this standard, it should have a good, normal flavor and aroma for the predominant floral source and is free from caramelization, smoke, fermentation, chemicals and other odor causes. As with the absence of defects, it should practically have no defects that affect appearance or edibility. In terms of clarity, the honey must be clear in which it may contain air bubbles contain a trace of pollen grains or other finely divided particles of suspended material that do not affect appearance.

For a honey to be given a Grade B standard, it should have water content greater than 18.6% but less than 20.0%, and for its flavor and aroma to pass this standard, it should be reasonably good and be practically free from caramelization; free from smoke, fermentation, chemicals, and other causes. As with the absence of defects, it should be reasonably free from particles which do not materially affect appearance or edibility. In terms of its clarity, it should be reasonably clear in which it may contain air bubbles, pollen grains, or other finely divided particles of suspended material that do not materially affect appearance.

For a honey to be given a Grade C standard, it should have water content less than 20.0%, and for its flavor and aroma to pass this standard, it should be fairly good and be reasonably free from caramelization; free from smoke, fermentation, chemicals, and other causes. As with the absence of defects, it should be fairly free from particles which do not seriously affect appearance or edibility. In terms of its clarity, it should be fairly clear in which it may contain air bubbles, pollen grains, or other finely divided particles of suspended material that do not seriously affect appearance.

Substandard honeys have water content greater than 20%, and its flavor and aroma, as well as its absence of defect and clarity all fail the standard of Grade C.

The standards on grading of honey differ according to countries, but basically the USDA standard is mostly followed in most parts of the industry.

 

 

 

Write your review

Comments have to be approved before showing up